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iPhone 5 FAQs – Frequently Asked Questions

Are you a planning to get an iPhone 5 or currently own one? Do you have any questions about it? Here’s Sydney CBD Repair Team answering those queries.

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What’s different about the iPhone 5?

On the outside, the iPhone 5’s main difference is its taller, thinner design. The display now measures 4 inches diagonally (up from 3.5 inches), which gives you an extra row of icons and more space for browsing, apps, and movies. Inside there’s LTE support, a faster A6 chip, camera improvements, and an extra microphone.

What about that new dock connector?

What Apple calls Lightning is a new proprietary connector that’s 80 percent smaller than the old 30-pin connectors. Its main feature: there’s no top or bottom, so you can plug it in either way. The older plugs needed to be oriented correctly.

Of course, this change means your old cables and things like docks and third-party audio systems won’t work with your new phone (yeah, that’s annoying). To get around that, Apple’s got an adapter that you’ll have to buy (naturally), and it ain’t cheap. It’s $29 per adapter. Alternatively, Apple will sell a Lightning-to-USB cable for $19 and a Lightning-to-30-pin cable for $39. Expect cheaper third-party adapters to surface in the future, but for now your options are very limited.

The glass on the back is gone?

Yes and no. The back of the new device is mainly metal, though there are glass windows on the top and bottom of the phone to let the various antennas communicate. Apple’s done something similar on past versions of the iPod Touch, and even the iPad with 3G.

And the SIM is even smaller?

Indeed. The iPhone 4 brought us the smaller micro SIM card (first seen in the original iPad), and now we’re getting an even smaller nano SIM. Unfortunately, larger SIMs won’t work in the iPhone 5 even if you try to shave them down. The newer spec isn’t just smaller in shape, it’s thinner too.

Will the battery life change?

There’s no change in battery life between last year’s model and this year’s mode when it comes to talk time. Like the iPhone 4S, the iPhone 5 is rated for 8 hours of talking over 3G.

What do I need to know about LTE? How do I know if I get it in my area?

LTE is a 4G technology that carriers started pushing out in the United States over the last couple of years. As you might expect, it’s faster than 3G, with exact speeds depending on your carrier. The result for you, though, will be faster downloads and uploads, faster streaming, and faster Web browsing.

iPhone Screen Replacement

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I don’t get LTE coverage where I live. Will the phone still work?

Yes, the phone defaults down to a 3G connection, just like it goes back down to EDGE when there’s no 3G available.

I’ve heard 4G LTE can be a battery hog, can I turn it off when I’m not using it?

Yes, unlike the iOS 5.1 update earlier this year — which took away 3G toggle (and never brought it back) — you can manually switch down to the 3G network only.

But what about global LTE roaming?

As of now, none of the carriers is offering LTE roaming outside the United States. And this is where it gets complicated. Though the CDMA iPhone supports five LTE bands, AT&T’s iPhone 5 supports only two. We’re not sure why. That won’t make a difference when you’re home, but that means the AT&T iPhone 5’s global LTE coverage will be less extensive, if we ever get it.

Will I be able to use the iPhone 5 overseas?

Yes, though there are a couple of caveats. With the iPhone 5, Apple is doing away with the dual-mode GSM/CDMA support that we saw in all versions of the iPhone 4S. Instead, it’s selling three distinct iPhone 5 versions: one CDMA-based model and two GSM-based models with slightly different LTE bands. Having separate versions is another factor that makes carrier interoperability difficult. On the other hand, losing the CDMA support on AT&T phones is irrelevant since AT&T customers have no use for it anyway.


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